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INDONESIAN COFFEE CULTURE

 

 

Ever since its initial introduction in the 17th & 18th century era, Indonesians have been attached to coffee. Drinking coffee has become a tradition and part of everyday life of Indonesian people that can not be skipped. In major cities like Jakarta, Bandung, Surabaya and Medan, numerous International coffee shop chains and cafes operate in shopping malls and office buildings. But the genuine coffee culture is observable on the street level. 

Street vendors sell coffee candies to instant coffee for those who missed out on their morning coffee routines. Almost in every street corner, roadside "stalls" or warung kopi are often packed with visitors. They serve unrestrained brewed coffee in a glass. Most Indonesians prefer to drink black coffee with sugar. Besides this plain coffee, people also serve coffee with herbs and spices.

Some areas in Sumatra, the villages community like West Sumatra, drink coffee from coffee leaves - brewed with hot water - creating a subtle coffee flavor in a cup. They call it Kopi Kahwa. In Aceh, served in a manner that is filtered by the filter length or so-called coffee attraction. They call it Kopi Tarik or Coffee Pull. Below is some examples of Indonesia's coffee culture. May this be an inspiration for coffee connoisseurs to bring Indonesia's coffee culture into America. 

Kopi Tubruk (Plain Brewed Coffee)

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This is the most popular brewed coffee in the country. To make this it is best to use 3 teaspoons of ground coffee for each glass of boiling water and add 3 teaspoons of sugar. Nowadays, several big national companies produce and offer ready-made mixtures in sachet, enough for one cup of coffee. It is a tremendous success in local market and even exported to several Asian countries like Malaysia, Singapore, China and Saudi Arabia.

How to make Kopi Tubruk: 

1. To make a cup add two teaspoons of fine or medium ground coffee (sugar is optional) into a cup
2. Boil the water and then add it to the cup at the boiling temperature
3. Stir so the water and the coffee grounds mix well
4. Let it stay and cook with the coffee for a few minutes until most of the ground coffee has settled in the bottom
5. Enjoy your coffee but leave the "mud" at the bottom alone. Don't drink it

(this recipe is inspired from Thei Zervaki's blog on "Crushed Beans: Aroma of Heaven" article)

KOPI TARIK (PULLED COFFEE)

Kopi Tarik is a special brewed Aceh Arabica coffee mixed with sugar. In the process of mixing and brewing the newly brewed coffee is poured repeatedly from one container to another one using cotton strainer just to give special thickness and rich taste.

Kopi Tarik is sold at coffee shops in Aceh regions, which mostly visited by men who become regular customers. They would sit for hours from dawn till dark talking about local affairs. This coffee generally has a distinctive taste and arome. Besides considered delicious, Kopi Tarik is believed to pull more fragrant when brewed that way.

Kopi Jahe (GINGER COFFEE)

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Brewed coffee mixed with ginger and palm sugar which can be found mostly in Java. This traditional coffee blend has already been produced by several manufactures and sold in sachets, which promote it as herbal medication besides known as traditional drinks. This is believed to be good for alleviating flu.

kopi joss (Joss coffee)

This is a special unrestrained brewed coffee which, in the process of brewing, a piece of burning charcoal is immersed into the coffee to give baking taste to the coffee. The name is taken from ‘joss’ sound of the emerging charcoal. This special coffee is commonly found in roadside stalls of Yogyakarta, Java’s cultural heartland.

If you visit the city of Yogyakarta, time to stop by and try Kopi Joss. In the North Station or Station Tugu Yogyakarta, many found angkringan which provide the main menu Kopi Joss. Angkringan itself is a wheel barrow that sell a variety of foods and beverages that are usually found on the side of the road. The word itself refers angkringan of the Java language of words that have meaning perched sit back.

The coffee beans are then formulated his own by roasting, after roasting until finely ground and then inserted into a designated place. The traditional way is believed to retain the flavor and aroma of coffee beans since the beginning of the process of picking. The water used to brew coffee cook Joss must use the kettle or similar large pot made of tin over a charcoal stove.

Once the coffee powder is mixed with a few small spoon of sugar, can also add a little milk. Hot water who had been already boiling in a charcoal furnace is slowly poured into a glass. Splash of boiling hot water emits smoke and aroma of coffee are very strong when it hits the coffee and sugar in a glass. Moreover, after the seller stirred cup of coffee on the table angkringan. Fragrant aroma of coffee the more savory.

kopi bumbu (spiced coffee)

Brewed coffee mixed with cinnamon, cardamom, clove and sugar. This blend was introduced hundreds years ago to Indonesians through cultural influence brought by Middle Eastern people who immigrated and living in the country since then.

Kopi sereh (lemongrass coffee)

Lemongrass has been used by Indonesian people as a aromatic foodstuff in many traditional recipes. Coffee with lemongrass gives specific aromatic taste and gives freshness to the body.